[Top 12] Marvel Snap Best Decks In The Game

Ohhhh! SNAP!


Start climbing to infinity!

Climbing the ladder of Marvel Snap ain’t exactly the easiest of challenges. We often find ourselves wanting to use our favorite Marvel characters to bash in our foes but often getting countered on the last turn. Losing that burst of two! Four! Or even EIGHT cubes can be a devastating sight to see if you plan on climbing your way to Infinite. But what exactly are the best decks to use to avoid that?

Sure, we want to use our favorite Marvel characters, but a frequent debate strikes again when we think of who is the absolute best? Is it Captain America? Iron Man? Black Panther? Could be any of them! But on the board of Marvel Snap, there are a few decks that stand superior to the others.

These decks are meta-defining and overall consistent throughout most games. They can get you many cubes and get you to breeze past the ranks and get straight to Infinite rank to get that gorgeous infinity card back and flex on your opponents. So what are these decks? And which ones hit the top six spots and which hit the bottom six spots? Let’s find out.

 

12. The Living Tribunal

Our favorite cosmic being of everything balanced.

I don’t see a world out there that would list the best Marvel Snap decks without at least bringing up one of the strongest Marvel characters, The Living Tribunal. Tribunal excels at getting the total power of the board split equally amongst all three locations, perfectly balanced! He’s consistent in the fact that you’ll always have that range in how much power you’ll have by the end of the game. 

Pairing him with Iron Man, Mystique, and Onslaught all in one lane can put up a huge number for your opponent to deal with. You can also pair him with cards like Ravonna Renslayer and Sera to reduce the cost of your cards for that final play! Wave, Jubilee, and Iron Lad work some magic by getting some of those higher-cost cards, like The Living Tribunal, out on earlier turns. Speaking of magic, Magik also gives you that extra turn to fully set up and get all the cards you need to win, down onto the board.

I’ve dabbled in Living Tribunal decks and have hit infinite with one. Although it is dependent on your card draws, if you get the combo out right, it’s ever so satisfying to see that burst of power spread onto all three lanes. Since balance changes haven’t touched him or his support, this deck is still very viable! 

Strengths of the deck:

  • It's Hard for your opponent to counter: If you are able to draw your full combo and gauge what kind of deck your opponent has, usually you’ll just win! The deck thrives on stuff like Destroy decks or even Patriot decks, where they don’t have much of a tech option to stop you.
  • Location benefits: The Living Tribunal can often thrive when paired with random locations like Nidavellir and Onslaught’s Citadel. These locations give Iron Man a huge boost in power to spread amongst the three lanes. Since you’re spreading your power, this can also lend itself to getting power in hard-to-reach locations like Death’s Domain and Luke’s Bar.
  • Consistent cube gains: This may sound like an odd positive since it involves retreating as well, but The Living Tribunal is one of the easiest decks for you to determine their success. You will usually lose if they have a tech option to stop your combo from happening. But if you’re fighting a deck that you know for sure doesn’t have any options, then you will almost always win! If they do, then it's a good way to tell yourself that it's time to retreat and avoid losing more than one cube.

The Living Tribunal cards: 

  • Ravonna Renslayer (2 cost)
  • Zabu (2 cost)
  • Mystique (3 cost)
  • Magik (3 cost)
  • Wave (3 cost)
  • Jubilee (4 cost)
  • Super Skrull (4 cost)
  • Iron Lad (4 cost)
  • Iron Man (5 cost)
  • Sera (5 cost)
  • Onslaught (6 cost)
  • The Living Tribunal (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Howard the Duck (1 cost)
  • Psylocke (2 cost)
  • Cosmo (3 cost)
  • Blink (5 cost)

 

11. Classic Discard

A classic deck with some new additions from The Black Order.

Sometimes some of the older decks with a bit of refining can still reign supreme in the competitive scene. I still play this one fairly actively and have enjoyed it ever since it was in its early stages with the old America Chavez. This is the perfect go-to for fulfilling any need to discard some of your cards. It’s also a fantastic showcase of cards like Morbius and The Collector, who get quite powerful if you play your cards right.

The goal here is to discard all those cards that want to be discarded. You usually want to shoot to draw cards like Miek, Morbius, and The Collector early, getting them onto the board so you can build them up much faster. Cards like Blade, Colleen Wing, Lady Sif, and Corvus Glaive are all necessary here to discard your cards to get the main three stronger to begin with! But we can’t forget about the king of discard, M.O.D.O.K., who’s laser blast wipes your entire hand and builds up Morbius in an instant.

Swarm, Apocalypse, and Helicarrier are essential to building these cards up since discarding them doesn’t necessarily remove them from your hand, meaning you can constantly keep discarding. Discarding a Helicarrier and getting all those random cards can also come in handy since it can potentially give you a card to really press against your opponent. 

Strengths of the deck:

  • Can adapt to most situations: This deck excels at adapting to tough corners and a tricky opponent on the fly. Whether that be filling a lane with Swarms to stop a nasty Green Goblin from clogging your side of the board, Miek is also incredible at adapting since he is able to move to other sides of the board every time you discard.
  • Consistent power gain: What do I mean by this? Well, if there’s a location about to be locked down, like The Vault or a Flooded location, then Morbius, The Collector, or Miek can all be played there and constantly gain power in that location. You can’t play there, but what matters is that the cards you threw down before they got locked up are still gaining power as you play, securing a clear and cut win.
  • Some cards don’t even need to be played: Cards like Swarm, Proxima Midnight, and Apocalypse are necessary cards for the deck and are pretty necessary to keep in the hand itself until the last turn. You don’t really ever have to worry about using energy to play these cards since they don’t need to be played until turn six. If Swarm and Apocalypse are kept in your hand until turn six and have been discarded multiple times, then a turn six, twenty-power Apocalypse with five zero-cost Swarms is a massive play.

Classic Discard Cards:

  • Miek (1 cost)
  • Blade (1 cost)
  • Morbius (2 cost)
  • The Collector (2 cost)
  • Swarm (2 cost)
  • Colleen Wing (2 cost)
  • Lady Sif (3 cost)
  • Corvus Glaive (3 cost)
  • Proxima Midnight (4 cost)
  • M.O.D.O.K. (5 cost)
  • Apocalypse (6 cost)
  • Helicarrier (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Nebula (1 cost)
  • Sword Master (3 cost)
  • Daken (3 cost)
  • Hell Cow (4 cost)
  • Dracula (4 cost)

 

10. Phoenix Force

The Pheonix Force burns again!

 Move over Jean Grey; it’s time to find a new host for the Phoenix Force, and that is... Multiple Man? Phoenix Force is definitely one of the highest-performing decks out there right now due to the number of options it has to win. Plus, similar to The Living Tribunal, there isn’t much that your opponent can do to counter your hellstorm.

Phoenix Force revives a card from the dead and merges into it, making whoever it revives the new host of the force. More importantly, though, it allows the card revived to move each turn! This is massive for cards like Multiple Man and Human Torch, who can have their abilities activated constantly every time they move. Pair one of them with Venom or Carnage to kill said card, and then bring it back from the dead with the Phoenix Force.

The deck also has another way of securing a victory by taking cards like Shuri, Nimrod, and Arnim Zola. If you don’t draw your Phoenix Force or your Human Torch, that’s completely fine! You can then go to the Shuri/Nimrod option. Double your Nimrod’s power and eat him with Venom or Carnage to send twelve power into the other two lanes and spread them across the board.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Conquest: This bonus point is a showcase that this deck is incredible in the Conquest gamemode. You always have a gauge on when to snap, meaning you don’t have to think twice about doubling that reward for winning. If you see Multiple Man, Carnage, and Phoenix Force in your hand, instantly snap and say good luck to your opponent on dealing with those Multiple Men.
  • Easy to adapt to certain situations: If you don’t draw your Phoenix Force, that’s fine. You have plenty of other options to choose from. You can do Shuri and Nimrod as stated before, or you can even add Nico Minoru to the deck, wait till she can double her power, play Hulkbuster on her, and then use Arnim Zola to put her on the other two locations with a whopping twenty power!
  • Mobility: Any time you play a deck with cards that can move across the board, you instantly have a huge advantage over your opponent. Say you see a Shang Chi incoming to take down your giant forty-power Human Torch. Well, if you know it’s coming, you can swiftly move him to another spot to dodge and trick your opponent. Essentially, they waste energy on nothing.

Phoenix Force cards:

  • Nico Minoru (1 cost)
  • Human Torch (1 cost)
  • Ghost Spider (1 cost)
  • Carnage (2 cost)
  • Multiple Man (2 cost)
  • Hulkbuster (2 cost)
  • Doctor Strange (2 cost)
  • Venom (3 cost)
  • Shuri (4 cost)
  • Phoenix Force (4 cost)
  • Nimrod (5 cost)
  • Arnim Zola (6 cost) 

Other Great substitutes:

  • Iron Fist (1 cost)
  • Dagger (2 cost)
  • Cloak (2 cost)
  • Forge (2 cost)
  • Deathlock (3 cost)

 

9. Destroy

We... Are Venom.

Finally, a deck where we can use our favorite merc with a mouth! Deadpool! Coincidentally, in this deck, he’s also paired up with Wolverine. Destroy is a classic deck in Marvel Snap, similar to Classic Discard. However, the difference is that destroy hasn’t really changed much at all since balance changes and is still mostly the same deck as it was when it was first created.

The deck is also very simple to play compared to other high-level competitive decks. Simply throw your Deadpool, Wolverine, and X-23 into a lane and slam down Carnage, Venom, or Deathlock to kill them. Repeat this with all your destroy cards, and you’ll find not only quite the large Deadpool in hand but also a massive Wolverine hopping from location to location each time you destroy him.

All this destruction also allows your Death to become a zero cost and your Knull to reach levels of power unheard of. The deck knows what it is and excels at what it is. It is always a deck I fear when I play Marvel Snap, and it often gets to a point where you just can’t do too much to halt Destroy's rapid power growth.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Big Numbers: This deck often gets really high numbers down onto the board very quickly. Whether that's Deadpool, who’s been doubling his power this whole time, or Venom, who had quite the giant snack. Follow that up with Arnim Zola on the Venom and spread that to two other lanes, giving your opponent quite a lot to tango with.
  • Game-Winning Locations: This deck’s best locations probably just instantly give you the win; there really isn’t much your opponent can do. If locations like the Altar of Death, Death’s Domain, or Cloning Vats show up, then it's game over for the enemy. Instantly snap upon seeing any of those locations.
  • Killmonger: This might sound like a weird positive since it is all around one card in the deck, Killmonger. Killmonger’s ability is just so good because not only does it destroy your own cards like Deadpool and X-23, but it also destroys your enemy’s cards! He’s an excellent tech option for those problematic Kitty Prydes or Nebulas.

Destroy cards:

  • Deadpool (1 cost)
  • Nico Minoru (1 cost)
  • X-23 (1 cost)
  • Carnage (2 cost)
  • Wolverine (2 cost)
  • Hulkbuster (2 cost)
  • Killmonger (3 cost)
  • Venom (3 cost)
  • Deathlock (3 cost)
  • Arnim Zola (6 cost)
  • Knull (6 cost)
  • Death (8 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Forge (2 cost)
  • Bucky Barnes (2 cost)
  • Magik (3 cost)
  • Lady Deathstrike (5 cost)

 

8. Ramp

HULK SMASH!

Ramp is definitely quite a unique deck, as unlike the others, this isn’t really a combo deck. This deck’s primary goal is to get those big five and six costs down as soon as possible to build up big numbers simply with big cards. This deck proves to be quite the fiend in the competitive scene today, especially after Sandman’s buff. 

Your most important cards in this deck are those that get the big guys out early. So cards like Electro, Wave, and Jubilee are going to be your bread and butter. They all allow you to ramp up and get out those heavy hitters. Doctor Doom, Red Hulk, and Magneto are all incredible cards to be able to get down in a lane much earlier than turns five and six.

Sandman also has a huge spot in this deck since his ability affects your enemy more than it affects you. You are already basically putting one card down each turn, especially if you have Electro down, so he really doesn’t do much to harm you. However, against Bounce, Silky Smooth, and Loki, you’ll completely throw them off their curve. Ramp still continues to surprise and screw up player’s strategies, making it a great deck to take to infinite.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Limiting the Opponent: Sandman is such a huge card for this deck to have. Making the opponent only able to play one card the next turn can be devastating to their combo. Not only that, Magneto can use his magnetism to move their cards out of spots they want them in, and Red Hulk practically forces them to use every bit of energy they have each turn.
  • Fantastic Power Spread: The deck has an amazing method of getting power in hard-to-reach locations or just spreading a significant amount of power across the board. A classic method of doing that with this deck is playing Doctor Doom and then throwing Odin onto him the following turn, flooding the other lanes with Doom bots.
  • Movement: This deck contains both Jeff and Vision, two cards who make great use of getting around the board. Of course, this also means they can trick your opponents, prevent clutter, and have easy access to other locations. Jeff also completely ignores Sandman’s ability, which means a turn six Vision and Jeff is possible even though Sandman allows only one card to be played.

Ramp cards:

  • Nebula (1 cost)
  • Jeff the Baby Land Shark (2 cost)
  • Electro (3 cost)
  • Wave (3 cost)
  • Jubilee (4 cost)
  • Blink (5 cost)
  • Sandman (5 cost)
  • Vision (5 cost)
  • Doctor Doom (6 cost)
  • Odin (6 cost)
  • Red Hulk (6 cost)
  • Magneto (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Psylocke (2 cost)
  • Hope Summers (3 cost)
  • Doctor Octopus (5 cost)
  • Leader (6 cost)
  • Alioth (6 cost)

 

7. Silky Smooth

Thwip!

Now it’s time to talk about our favorite web slingers, but specifically Silk and our favorite neighborhood Spider-Man. Silky Smooth was a deck I ran months ago to incredible success, but after they nerfed Angela a ton, the deck became obsolete and couldn’t compete with the meta at the time. So why am I bringing this deck up now? Well, because Angela’s nerf has been officially reverted as of April 4, which means this deck has been thriving yet again.

Angela is key to this deck due to her ability to get +2 every time a card is played onto her. Pair this card up with Kitty Pryde to constantly keep building Angela up each time Kitty is played onto her. But why is it called Silky Smooth? Well, because of Silk and the other mobility cards in the deck. 

Spider-Man, Silk, Nocturne, and Vision are all capable of not only being played on Angela but also moving out of her lane so more cards can be played on her. Elsa Bloodstone and Hope Summers also get benefits from cards being played on them, so throw them in there too, and you have a deck granting you incredible stats just by playing Kitty Pryde and other movement cards.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Incredible Tech Options: This deck includes cards like Shang Chi that don’t necessarily give you insane power for your combo but are instead a great tech option to destroy some of your opponents high-power cards. Nocturne and Magneto are also here, who both disrupt your opponent in different ways and give you more than just raw strength.
  • Low Cost Cards: The cards in the deck are much cheaper than other decks here; the only two high cost cards are Vision and Magento, which gives you more options to play in earlier turns. This can easily overwhelm an opponent who is hoping to beat you in the later rounds.
  • Maneuverability: Once again, mobility is still a massive benefit to any deck, and this deck has the most moving cards in it. Jeff, Silk, Spider-Man, Nocturne, Vision, and Magneto all move cards and can easily confuse your enemy. Kraven the Hunter is also in this deck, and he gets stats off of just a card moving to his location, so we have another big stat gainer like Angela in the deck.

Silky Smooth cards:

  • Kitty Pryde (1 cost)
  • Angela (2 cost)
  • Kraven the Hunter (2 cost)
  • Jeff the Baby Land Shark (2 cost)
  • Silk (2 cost)
  • Elsa Bloodstone (3 cost)
  • Hope Summers (3 cost)
  • Nocturne (3 cost)
  • Spider-Man (3 cost)
  • Shang Chi (4 cost)
  • Vision (5 cost)
  • Magneto (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Nightcrawler (1 cost)
  • Captain Marvel (4 cost)
  • Miles Morales Spider-Man (4 cost)
  • Doctor Doom (6 cost)
  • Red Hulk (6 cost)

 

6. Silver Surfer

Surfing from planet to planet.

Galactus’ right-hand man is the MVP of this deck, the Silver Surfer himself. Surfer is probably one of the most satisfying combo decks in the game. It takes a while to set up, but when that turn six or seven explosion of power happens, wow, does it feel good to see those numbers rise.

The Silver Surfer ability to give plus two power to all three costs means that three costs are his best friends here, sorry Galactus. Sebastian Shaw is probably the best showcase of this power since Surfer ends up getting Shaw quite hefty in power by the end of the game. Pairing the Surfer up with Wong also allows him to fly across the world twice and boost that amount of power even higher.

Brood is also a good choice for this deck since it’s not just one three-cost card, but three of them, meaning the Surfer would buff not just Brood but their broodlings as well. To top it all off, Sera is an essential part of this deck due to her ability to make all three-cost cards cost two instead of three on the final turn. So you are able to play three of your heavy hitters on the final turn and even surprise your opponent.

Strengths of the deck:

  • It’s ability to adapt to the meta: Since it buffs three cost cards, it easily makes this deck one of the easiest to change cards in and out of. Say there’s too many toxic decks at the moment; throw Luke Cage in since he’s a three-cost. Say there’s too many ongoing decks out there; throw Rogue in. All of these substitutions work perfectly in changing the style of the deck to combat the meta.
  • Multiple ways to win: Not only do you have the Surfer line, but there’s another line that this deck has, which is Hazmat. She inflicts toxins on your opponent to reduce their power. Say the Surfer combo isn’t quite coming to plan, then switch it up with a Wong, Hazmat, Absorbing Man, and Odin combo to make their cards’ power shrink in size.
  • Constantly Growing Power: Thanks to Surfer and even Ironheart, you will basically have the mindset that none of your cards are ever going to just stay at their base power. They will constantly get stronger each time your strategies succeed and you get to that incredible Silver Surfer play. This deck makes it easy to combat Clutter and Lockdown decks since they can never just guarantee they’re winning that lane; they always have to be on their toes.

Silver Surfer cards:

  • Hazmat (2 cost)
  • Ironheart (3 cost)
  • Mystique (3 cost)
  • Brood (3 cost)
  • Magik (3 cost)
  • Silver Surfer (3 cost)
  • Luke Cage (3 cost)
  • Sebastian Shaw (3 cost)
  • Wong (4 cost)
  • Absorbing Man (4 cost)
  • Sera (5 cost)
  • Odin (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Okoye (2 cost)
  • Forge (2 cost)
  • Rogue (3 cost)
  • Nakia (3 cost)
  • Mobius M. Mobius (3 cost)
  • Killmonger (3 cost)
  • Red Guardian (3 cost)
  • Nocturne (3 cost)
  • Spider-Man (3 cost)
  • Gladiator (3 cost)

 

5. Ongoing

No no, you play your cards where I tell you to.

Ongoing has always been a deck prominent in the game, but mostly in lower ranks. The deck never really got anywhere because the cards had good abilities but not enough overall power to boost them into the top ranks. But over the past few months, Spectrum, Omega Red, Ant-Man, and recently Jean Grey have all gotten buffs to their power. Now this deck is not only viable, but incredibly powerful in the right hands.

Jean Grey is carrying this deck with her ability to force both players to play in one lane each turn, unless it is full, of course. Why does this matter so much? Well, Mojo would like to tell you why. Mojo gains plus six power when a location is full by both players, and if they are forced to play in one location, then he’s pretty much going to be at that tough eight power every game. 

He’s not the only one who benefits from that, either. Man-Thing can reduce the power of the cards they play. The Punisher, well, he punishes the opponent and grows stronger with each card they play there. Top it off with Spectrum and Omega Red, and you have a deck that can not only disrupt your opponent but easily spread power to other locations.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Ongoing cards: Having ongoing cards gives you some leeway in how you play the deck. It’s not on reveal; it’s always ongoing, meaning their power probably won’t stay the same and their ability will constantly persist throughout the match. Pair this with Cosmo, and you can even completely stop your opponent from shutting down your abilities.
  • Limiting the space where your opponent can play: Cards like Man-Thing and Lizard do excellent jobs at making your foe confused on how to play around a situation. Say you have Nebula in one lane and Lizard in another. Do they play on Nebula to stop her from gaining power? Or do they play on Lizard to start filling the location to reduce his power? It really makes your opponent confused, which can lead to them often misplaying.
  • Jean Grey: Jean Grey’s ability is so strong in this current meta. Not only does she benefit you by getting your cards like Punisher and Mojo to their full potential, but she also completely counters the Ramp and Lockdown decks. Her lockdown capabilities completely halt any plans your opponent had made to win.

Ongoing deck cards:

  • Ant-Man (1 cost)
  • Nebula (1 cost)
  • Mojo (2 cost)
  • Armor (2 cost)
  • Lizard (2 cost)
  • Cosmo (3 cost)
  • The Punisher (3 cost)
  • Luke Cage (3 cost)
  • Jean Grey (3 cost)
  • Man-Thing (4 cost)
  • Omega-Red (4 cost)
  • Spectrum (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Howard the Duck (1 cost)
  • Jeff the Baby Land Shark (2 cost)
  • Mobius M. Mobius (3 cost)
  • Iron Lad (4 cost)
  • Iron Man (5 cost)
  • Doctor Doom (6 cost)

 

4. Clutter

It looks like you're all clogged up now.

Here’s a good change of pace: a deck not just revolving around big numbers but making the other side of the board have smaller numbers. Clutter doesn’t play quite like the other decks here, as your goal isn’t about building your board up but making their board smaller. With the main man, Annihilus, being the one to make those negative-powered characters switch sides in an instant.

What negative-powered characters do you bring? Well, that’s easy. The Hood and Sentry are the best examples. Sentry gives you that negative eight Void that you can send to your opponent’s side, and give them quite a small number on that right side. However, it’s not just about making their number small; it’s about clogging and cluttering their board.

White Widow, Debri, and Green Goblin are all cards that send other cards to your opponent’s side. The purpose is to give them little to no room to play any cards, and if they can’t play any cards, then... they just lose. Daredevil and Professor X also work together to lock down a lane, so you’re guaranteed to win a free lane thanks to Daredevil's knowledge of where they are playing. Just play X where they aren’t playing, and he just secures a victory in that lane instantly.

Strengths of the Deck: 

  • Cluttering their Board: Filling their board up with junk like The Hood, Widow’s Kiss, Rocks, and Green Goblin severely limits any space they have to play cards. Any deck that relies on playing bigger cards for later turns might suffer if you fill a lane of theirs up early. If you do manage to clog a lane, then they just have to accept defeat in that lane since they will be unable to play anything.
  • Control over the Board: Because your opponent is struggling with trying to stop you from cluttering their side, you basically have free reign and control over where their cards are going. If they want to prevent a negative eight Void from getting sent to their side, then they are required to fill that side of the board. They pretty much lose their control over the board since you are controlling where they have to play cards more than they are.
  • Negative Locations: This deck is one of the few decks that actually loves locations that reduce power or summon other cards. Locations like Negative Zone, Central Park, and Savage Land actually benefit you and work towards not only reducing the power of cards you send over but also clogging them up more and making your job easier.

Clutter Deck cards:

  • The Hood (1 cost)
  • Nebula (1 cost)
  • Daredevil (2 cost)
  • White Widow (2 cost)
  • Jeff the Baby Land Shark (2 cost)
  • Ravonna Renslayer (2 cost)
  • Green Goblin (3 cost)
  • Debri (3 cost)
  • Sentry (4 cost)
  • Professor X (5 cost)
  • Annihilus (5 cost)
  • Cannonball (5 cost)

Other Great substitutes: 

  • Storm (3 cost)
  • Shang Chi (4 cost)
  • Lady Deathstrike (5 cost)
  • Mockingbird (5 cost)
  • Red Hulk (6 cost)

 

3. Patriot

Those cards without abilities could sure use a power boost!

Patriot is an all-time favorite of mine and many players. It was one of the best decks to climb up when you have a low collection level. But a few months ago, his deck started to fizzle out because of cards like Alioth. Now, after a significant recent Ultron buff, he’s back in the meta and better than he ever was. Finally giving those cards with no abilities something to work with.

With this deck, your goal is to spread cards with no abilities across the board to buff with both Patriot and Blue Marvel; placing Onslaught on top of them will only double their boosts and give those cards with no abilities quite a lot of power. But how do I spread those cards with no abilities, you might be asking? Well, that’s where our friends Squirrel Girl, Mysterio, and Ultron come in to help.

Squirrel Girl and Mysterio are both cheap cards to use to spread out cards that have no abilities. However, you do not want to play them right away; playing them early can limit your board space, so it's best to save them for later turns. The same goes for Wasp, who costs nothing. Then we also have Mockingbird, who costs minus one per card that didn’t start in our hand, which counts Squirrels, Mysterio clones, and Ultron bots, making her a zero-cost nine power pretty easily.

Strengths of the Deck:

  • Easy to fill up boards: This deck allows you to play with a bit more patience than usual. Because you have a lot of cards that add other cards, it’s not necessarily important to rush to get those cards out as soon as you have enough energy. You want to save most of your cards for that final turn, and usually playing just a Patriot on turn three is perfectly fine.
  • Surprise Factor: Ultron and Mockingbird are quite the dynamic duo in this section. You may leave your enemy dazzled and confused at the fact that the only three cards you’ve played until turn six have been Dazzler, Patriot, and Blue Marvel. Your opponent is going to lose their mind when Ultron goes down on turn six and then suddenly your zero power on the far right lane shoots straight up to twenty!
  • Iron Lad: Iron Lad is a special card in this deck, mostly because he’s a perfect way to get the effects of those higher-cost cards out onto the board much earlier. If he hits Onslaught, then that's just one less six cost you have to play when the turn comes. Oh, but if he hits Iron Man, I’d snap immediately; that's the game winner right there.

Patriot deck cards:

  • Wasp (0 cost)
  • Squirrel Girl (1 cost)
  • Dazzler (2 cost)
  • Mysterio (2 cost)
  • Patriot (3 cost)
  • Wave (3 cost)
  • Iron Lad (4 cost)
  • Iron Man (5 cost)
  • Blue Marvel (5 cost)
  • Mockingbird (5 cost)
  • Onslaught (6 cost)
  • Ultron (6 cost)

Other Great substitutes: 

  • Ant-Man (1 cost)
  • Ravonna Renslayer (2 cost)
  • Mystique (3 cost)
  • Doctor Doom (6 cost)

 

2. Loki

Use their deck against them!

Those who have played the game for quite a while will know the terror of Snap, aka the God of Mischief himself, Loki. Loki was one of the strongest, most overtuned cards they’ve ever released, and though they’ve nerfed him quite a bit in his lifespan, he still, to this day, is a god to be reckoned with on the board.

Loki’s unique ability to copy the opponent’s deck onto your hand and make them all cost one less is quite incredible. Not only does it give you a cheap deck, but it also feeds you information about what your opponent could be planning. So with this deck, you want to fill your hand as much as you can so you can copy as many cards from your opponent as possible.

Snowguard, Cable, and Agent Coulson all give you brand new cards; pairing them all with Quinjet makes all the cards they give cost one less. Plus, because the Kitty Pryde, Angela, and Elsa Bloodstone line is so strong right now, this deck also has that combo as a follow-up if Loki just doesn’t end up working out.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Cost Reductions: Quinjet and Loki both incorporate cost reductions into your deck. Both of them combined can make two-cost cards that Loki takes cost zero! Think about how strong that is for a second; you basically have cards that cost nothing and have no limitations to being played besides board space. It’s incredibly strong, which is the main reason Loki is so good.
  • Information from Your Opponent: Not only does Loki copy their deck and literally give you basically your opponent’s entire list of cards, but it also lets you know what they’re about to do and gives you a ton of ways to counterplay. Cable also takes a card from them and is another way to get a ton of information about your foe’s deck.
  • Flexibility: The deck is very flexible since, besides the main combos of Loki and Kitty/Angela, you can basically fill the rest of the deck with tech cards. Nocturne, Red Guardian, and Shang Chi are all cards that can potentially be slotted in to ruin some of your opponent’s plays as sort of a backup if things don’t go your way.

Loki deck cards:

  • Kitty Pryde (1 cost)
  • Quinjet (1 cost)
  • Snowguard (1 cost)
  • Angela (2 cost)
  • Cable (2 cost)
  • Jeff the Baby Land Shark (2 cost)
  • Elsa Bloodstone (3 cost)
  • Red Guardian (3 cost)
  • Agent Coulson (3 cost)
  • Nocturne (3 cost)
  • Loki (4 cost)
  • Mockingbird (5 cost)

Other Great substitutes: 

  • Maria Hill (1 cost)
  • Valentina (2 cost)
  • Mirage (2 cost)
  • Mobius M. Mobius (3 cost)
  • Rogue (3 cost)
  • Luke Cage (3 cost)
  • Shang Chi (4 cost)
  • Doctor Doom (6 cost)

 

1. Hela

Minions to me.

And to nobody's surprise, we have not only had two Asgardian gods back to back, but now the Goddess of Death herself, Hela. Hela has completely ruled this game for months now, and I don’t think her terror is stopping any time soon. Her deck revolves around discarding higher-power cards and then bringing them back from the dead with Hela, which makes for insane, impossible-to-counter final turns.

Of course, since you need to discard cards, you need cards that are in fact designed to discard cards, duh! Blade, Lady Sif, and Corvus Glaive are all you really need; as long as at least two of your behemoths are discarded, you’ll still be looking at that explosive turn six. Black Cat is also a nice part of the deck since she discards herself and gives you one less card to worry about in your hand.

The big cards can often be swapped out based on preference, but the ones players typically go with are Red Hulk, Magneto, The Infinaut, and Death. You can also pair these big cards with Jubilee and pull one of them out early, then you can use Blink to swap Jubilee out for another big card and get quite a massive number on that lane. This deck is almost cartoonish in how much power you get on the board so fast.

Strengths of the deck:

  • Easy to Use: Hela is a very simple deck for players to pick up since it really is as simple as discarding two big cards and then bringing them back from the dead on the final turn. There are no tech options, ways to get random new cards, or ways to get information on your opponent. It is strictly to discard six costs and bring them back without having to pay that six-cost energy fee.
  • Black Knight: A key part of the deck that hasn’t been brought up yet is the Black Knight. The abilities of his Ebony Blade cannot go unnoticed. A potentially powerful card that cannot be destroyed. Discard Infinaut while the Knight is down, and you’ll get a twenty power, four cost, unkillable card to play. Snap immediately upon getting this combo.
  • Uncounterable: When you play Hela, you will truly feel how strong she is. Your opponent can basically only pray that you didn’t get an incredible draw or that your Corvus Glaive or Lady Sif accidentally discards Hela. If neither of those happen, then they probably just lose. The deck is just so strong that the only thing really stopping you is your draws and maybe that cute little dog, Cosmo.

Hela deck cards:

  • Black Knight (1 cost)
  • Blade (1 cost)
  • Corvus Glaive (3 cost)
  • Lady Sif (3 cost)
  • Jubilee (4 cost)
  • Black Cat (4 cost)
  • Blink (5 cost)
  • Hela (6 cost)
  • Red Hulk (6 cost)
  • Magneto (6 cost)
  • The Infinaut (6 cost)
  • Death (8 cost)

Other Great substitutes:

  • Dracula (4 cost)
  • Ghost Rider (4 cost)
  • Giganto (6 cost)

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I've gone into the hellish environment of the Demon ruins and the rough, dark alley ways of Gotham to speak of all my tales far and wide. Trust me, my strength stat is high enough to take on this task
Gamer Since: 2001
Favorite Genre: RPG
Currently Playing: Batman Arkham Knight, V Rising, Cult of the Lamb
Top 3 Favorite Games:Dark Souls: Prepare To Die Edition, Star Wars: Battlefront, Batman: Arkham Knight


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